Ecology & Evolution of Infectious Diseases Conference

A few weeks ago, Dr Lauren White from the University of Minnesota told us about the intersection of wildlife conservation, disease and human health for Endangered Species Day. Now she is back to give us a recap of the Ecology & Evolution of Infectious Disease Conference recently held in Glasgow – including some pretty nifty conference events complete with a Scottish flair! This year, the … Continue reading Ecology & Evolution of Infectious Diseases Conference

Countdown to ISEC!

There are only three more days to register for the next International Statistical Ecology Conference (ISEC). Many workshops are now fully-booked, but there is still a significant line-up of invited sessions, general speakers, and social events on offer. And with so many statistical ecologists attending, this conference promises to be well above average! But for those of you facing uncertainty, Dr Rachel McCrea, Chair of the ISEC Scientific … Continue reading Countdown to ISEC!

When Some Choughs Do Better Than Others

Red-billed choughs are a species of conservation concern, as discussed a recent Journal of Animal Ecology publication investigating their effective population size.  Amanda Trask, lead author of the study, recently finished her PhD at the University of Aberdeen on conservation genetics and demographics of one of the last remaining red-billed chough populations in Scotland, and is currently working as a Research Ecologist with the British Trust for … Continue reading When Some Choughs Do Better Than Others

Life on the edge: celebrating a successful long-term ecological study

The Scottish isles of St Kilda, off the west coast of the Outer Hebrides, have an important place in my heart. It was on St Kilda where I first realised that not all sheep are boring, where I sustained my first fieldwork-related injury (a broken hip caused by an impact during a sheep-chasing incident!), where I successfully ran my first Research Council grant, and where … Continue reading Life on the edge: celebrating a successful long-term ecological study