International Women’s Day 2023

It’s International Women’s Day and once again we look back over the blogs from the last year, and highlight five of our favourites written by women. At the same time, we also wanted to highlight the diversity of studies published in Journal of Animal Ecology. Celebrate women in science, and the awesome work they’ve done by checking out our favourites below, as well as a … Continue reading International Women’s Day 2023

Almost 50%: representation of women within Journal of Animal Ecology

This International Women’s Day, Journal of Animal Ecology’s Editors reflect on the path to improving the representation of women within our editorial board, and invite you to discuss how we, as a journal, may continue to support gender diversity overall. In 2007, Journal of Animal Ecology was in a period of growth. Submissions had increased greatly over the preceding years and our editorial board consisted … Continue reading Almost 50%: representation of women within Journal of Animal Ecology

Guppies only avoid infected shoalmates when they pose the highest risk of transmission

Jess Stephenson is a new Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. She is interested in factors affecting the spread of infectious diseases through natural populations, and how these ecological factors might affect the evolution of both host and parasite. Here, she describes her most recent paper on the role of host behaviour in disease transmission and shares the #StoryBehindThePaper. Across animal taxa, individuals … Continue reading Guppies only avoid infected shoalmates when they pose the highest risk of transmission

Did they choose my brain, my gender, or my race?

Following our #DiversityInEcology theme, this blog post talks about having (and overcoming!) imposter syndrome. Isabel Rojas-Ferrer is a cognitive ecologist who was recently invited to participate in a roundtable discussion with the Minister of Science of Canada. Learn how this experience changed her reasoning about imposter syndome. During my second year of my master’s degree I started feeling undeserving of my position as a graduate student. At … Continue reading Did they choose my brain, my gender, or my race?

Field Reports: Natalie Clay, Elton Prize winner

For this special episode of Field Reports, I interviewed the winner of this year’s Elton Prize, Dr Natalie Clay. We talk about ants, art, girls in STEM, nutritional ecology, and her award-winning paper.   Podcast: You can listen to the future episodes of the podcast on iTunes, or by searching ‘British Ecological Society Journals’ (and then look for ‘FieldReports’ playlist) on your favorite podcast hosting app. … Continue reading Field Reports: Natalie Clay, Elton Prize winner

Using crowd-sourced funding to track snakes

The understanding of the interplay of movement, behaviour and physiology that biologging offers has applied relevance for a range of fields, including evolutionary ecology, wildlife conservation and behavioural ecology. In recognition of this, the Journal of Animal Ecology has an upcoming Special Feature on Biologging  (submissions due 20th September). Unfortunately, animal-borne tags don’t come cheap. This was the problem recently-completed PhD student Ashleigh Wolfe faced … Continue reading Using crowd-sourced funding to track snakes

Women in Science and Abuse of Power

Following our launch of the #DiversityInEcology blog post series last week, here is our first contributed post! The series allows people to share their personal perspectives on the theme of diversity in ecology, and this particular post was received after putting out a call for submissions on Twitter. There are many articles out there that discuss the problem of power differentials. From a women in … Continue reading Women in Science and Abuse of Power

International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Science and gender equality are both vital for the achievement of the internationally-agreed Sustainable Development Goals. To help further gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, the United Nations General Assembly declared 11th February as the International Day of Women and Girls in Science. To celebrate, the Journal of Animal Ecology blog asked some of the Journal’s new Associate Editors about their role models … Continue reading International Day of Women and Girls in Science

How does infection alter animal migration performance? It’s complicated.

Animals move around. A lot. Migratory animals are widely assumed to play an important role in the long-distance dispersal of parasites and pathogens. But how does this affect the migratory animals themselves? PhD student Alice Risely, Deakin University, explains how infections might alter animal migration. Migratory animals spread pathogens. But how frequently? And how far? Is it super common for migratory birds to spread pathogens … Continue reading How does infection alter animal migration performance? It’s complicated.

Dodgy gut? Have a lemur cuddle!

According to new research published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, physical contact may be good for your health.  Well, at least if you’re a lemur. Scientists have found a direct link between physical contact and gut bacteria in red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer).  The study aim was to better understand causes of diversity within the animal’s gut microbiome.  These communities of belly bacteria play a key … Continue reading Dodgy gut? Have a lemur cuddle!